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When I google for examples I find examples of Hydrogen bond. Theoretically, Hydrogen should be able to bond with compounds with a much higher or much lower electronegativity than 2.2. I am 8th grade and my teacher told me that Hydrogen bond is not the same as Hydrogen's ionic bond. She refused to explain it to me as it was obviously out of syllabus and I had no else to ask to so here I am. Thank you in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ Saline hydrides such as NaH, CaH2 etc. are the best examples $\endgroup$ – 0.00 Jun 11 at 15:33
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    $\begingroup$ H+ can't form a true ionic bond. H- can and does. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 11 at 15:35
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Hydrogen does form ionic bonds. Although not as bare $\ce{H+}$, it can form ionic bonds in the form of $\ce{H-}$ (hydride anion). $\ce{H-}$ forms ionic bonds with alkali metal ions and alkaline earth metal ions (except $\ce{Be^{2+}}$). These type of ionic compounds formed by hydride ion are called saline hydrides, as they are salt type. These hydrides like $\ce{CaH2}$ (also known as hydrolith) can also be used for production of dihydrogen, as reducing agents, desiccant.

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    $\begingroup$ The lattice structures of lithium and magnesium hydrides feature six-coordination of the metal which has only four valence orbitals, and they readily hydrolyze to give the hydroxide plus hydrogen. On this basis I would call lithium and magnesium hydrides predominantly ionic. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Jun 11 at 16:30
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    $\begingroup$ @OscarLanzi, corrected. $\endgroup$ – 0.00 Jun 11 at 16:35

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