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I understand that both of these compounds are R but I do not understand why A is trans and C is cis.

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    $\begingroup$ You don't have to find that out; the problem statement says so. Then again, I don't believe they should be called diastereomers. $\endgroup$ Jun 7 at 6:10
  • $\begingroup$ Why should they not be diastereomers? They are stereoisomers, that are not mirror images of each other. So they are diastereomers. $\endgroup$ Jun 7 at 7:11
  • $\begingroup$ The picture that I've included is the answer to the question. The problem statement did not provide the information that A is trans and B is cis. I was confused on how to find the answer which is why I asked the quesiton. $\endgroup$
    – mae
    Jun 7 at 17:42
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In the case of cis-trans isomerism, you can refer to carbon molecules forming the carbon-carbon double bond as stereogenic centers. An example of cis-trans isomers is taken from here:

The carbon atoms that form the C=C double bond in 2-butene are called stereocenters or stereogenic atoms. A stereocenter is an atom for which the interchange of two groups converts one stereoisomer into another. The carbon atoms in the C=C double bond in 2-butene, for example, are stereocenters. Interchanging the CH3 and H substituents on the carbon atom on either side of the C=C double bond would convert cis-2-butene into trans-2-butene, and vice versa.

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