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I read all salts from sodium salts form colorless solutions unless the anion is colored. Can someone explain?

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    $\begingroup$ There is nothing to explain, really. White paint is white and remains white, unless mixed with some paint colored other than white. Same thing here. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Apr 2 at 6:49
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    $\begingroup$ Salts containing a counterion that is coloured will be coloured. the colour won't come from the sodium. $\endgroup$ – matt_black Apr 2 at 13:12
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    $\begingroup$ So, you ask what, really? Why they are colorless? $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Apr 2 at 13:52
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    $\begingroup$ New contributors need to be treated a bit more gently. Their questions generally indicate an introduction to the topic with unconnected facts. If we demonstrate one connection, they are likely to be able to make more connections, on their own. $\endgroup$ – James Gaidis Apr 2 at 15:47
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There are various colors of chemical compounds because color is dependent on all of the interactions of all the components of the mixture, including the concentration. Some materials can appear to be one color in dilute solution, but a significantly different color in concentrated solution, because the level of absorption at a particular wavelength becomes so high that it dominates the color.

In the case of the sodium salts, it turns out that sodium ion does not have an electronic transition in the visible range, so it's invisible! However, all the other materials, ions, compounds, etc., may contribute their own absorptions to the mixture.

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