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Is a mixture of $\ce{NH4OH}$ and $\ce{NH4NO3}$ a buffer solution?

I have seen some examples with $\ce{NH4OH}$ and $\ce{NH4Cl}$ but never $\ce{NH4NO3}$.

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    $\begingroup$ There should be no difference. Both are salts of strong acids, so... $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Mar 29 at 11:13
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    $\begingroup$ NH4OH does not exist as a molecule in water. There is NH3(aq), reacting with water $\ce{NH3(aq) + H2O <<=> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq)}$. In extreme conditions, like in interstellar space, it may exist as a donor-acceptor pair NH3.H2O $\endgroup$ – Poutnik Mar 29 at 12:29
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A buffer is a mixture of a weak acid with the conjugate weak base.

Is a mixture of $\ce{NH4OH}$ and $\ce{NH4NO3}$ a buffer solution? I have seen some examples with $\ce{NH4OH}$ and $\ce{NH4Cl}$ but never $\ce{NH4NO3}$.

Both mixtures contain $\ce{NH4+}$, a weak acid. Where is the conjugate weak base? You can either write $\ce{NH4OH}$ more conventionally (or in a more modern way) as ammonia in aqueous solution, $\ce{NH3(aq)}$, which is a weak base. Or you can recognize $\ce{OH-}$ in ammonium hydroxide as a strong base, which would react with the ammonium to make ammonia. In either way of looking at things, the conjugate base is present as well.

So it is a buffer.

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