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I know this has been asked before, but can anyone explain me in simpler terms? Why is $\ce{CO2}$ a Lewis acid? The carbon atom doesn't have any vacant orbitals to accept a lone pair. How can it be a Lewis acid?

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Suppose one of the doublets of one C=O bond moves to one of these two atoms. It will not be to the Carbon atom. The Oxygen atom is a better choice. And now this Oxygen atom would be negatively charged. As a consequence the Carbon atom is positively charged and has a vacant orbital able to accept a lone pair, for example from an $\ce{OH-}$ ion or from water. This will produce the ion $\ce{HCO3^-}$ (from $\ce{OH-}$) or $\ce{H2CO3}$ (from $\ce{H2O}$).

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