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The chemical formula is C10H22O. I don't know how to assign which group gets priority when it is formulated this way. I think there is an iso- or sec- involved, but I'm not sure. I've looked at other questions for guidance but nothing is similar to this. I don't know where to go from here and where to start with naming this. Please lend help as to where to start.organic compound with formula C10H22O

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    $\begingroup$ Please consider punctuating the question nicely. It will surely improve it. $\endgroup$ – user102687 Feb 13 at 3:43
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Chemistry SE! Have a look at some of the IUPAC recommendations. $\endgroup$ – z1273 Feb 13 at 12:52
  • $\begingroup$ "i believe the chemical formula is C10 H22 O, i think it is related or similar to 2-propylheptanol" – This looks like you just counted the atoms to get the molecular formula and then googled "C10H22O". This is not a useful approach in organic chemistry as your example nicely illustrates. $\endgroup$ – Loong Feb 13 at 13:24
  • $\begingroup$ "i don't know how to assign which group gets priority" – That might be because there are zero groups in this compound that could get such kind of priority. $\endgroup$ – Loong Feb 13 at 13:28
  • $\begingroup$ "i think there is an iso- or sec- involved" – No. And preferably, you don’t use “iso” and “sec” at all. $\endgroup$ – Loong Feb 13 at 13:29
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You are right on this point: it is not an alcohol because there is no $\ce{-OH}$ group ; it is an ether oxide. To name it, we are looking for the largest carbon chain: here it is $ \ce {CH_3 -CH_2 -CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_3} $ with 8 carbon atoms so the suffix of the compound is octane. We then add as a prefix the smallest carbon chain (here 2 carbon atoms so ethoxy) to which we add the number to indicate the position where the side chain is attached on the main chain (3 here) -> the prefix is therefore 3 -ethoxy So ultimately your chemical is 3-ethoxyoctane

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    $\begingroup$ "octane" is not a suffix. $\endgroup$ – Loong Feb 13 at 13:34

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