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In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series (for example, Balmer series, Lyman series, Paschen series), What is common to the lines within a series that makes grouping them together logical?

The answers say that each series has a different lower energy level, can anyone pls explain

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The Lyman series is made of lines in the spectrum corresponding to the return of the electron from a higher level ($n = 2, 3, 4,$ etc.) to the first and deepest level ($n = 1$) .

The Balmer series is made of lines in the spectrum corresponding to the return of the electron from a higher level ($n = 3, 4, 5$, etc.) to the second level ($n = 2$)

The Paschen series is made of lines in the spectrum corresponding to the return of the electron from a higher level ($n = 4, 5,$ etc.) to the third level ($n = 3$)

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  • $\begingroup$ Because the energies go with one over n squared, the energy of the transition is mostly determined by the lower level (e.g. the transition 2 to 1 has 75% of the energy compared to the transition infinity to 1). For that reason, the spectral lines are grouped by the lower level and not the higher level. $\endgroup$ Nov 30 '20 at 3:23

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