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I want to conduct a quantitative analysis on my acid etching solution for my Aluminum pre-treatment process. The easiest way for me to conduct my quantitative analysis of Al is through complexometric titration with EDTA and back-titration with standardized Zinc solution.

My problem is that there's also Chromium ions in my solution and it can bind with the EDTA which reduces the volume of Zn solution I utilize in my back-titration. [I have confirmed my dilemma because the solution I am using was analyzed through Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS).]

How can I mask the chromium ions in my solution so I can proceed with the complexometric titration?

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If I summarize, you want to make an EDTA titration of $\ce{Al^{3+}}$ in a solution containing also $\ce{Cr^{3+}}$ and $\ce{Cr^{6+}}$. The $\ce{Cr^{6+}}$ ions are usually in the form $\ce{CrO4^{2-}}$ and they don't interfere with $\ce{Al^{3+}}$ in EDTA titrations. But they can be eliminated by precipitation. The best thing to do is to oxidize $\ce{Cr^{3+}}$ into $\ce{CrO4^{2-}}$. In the old Treadwell's book, they propose to take $5$ mL $\ce{Cr^{3+}}$ solution, add $0.5$ mL of a saturated solution of $\ce{Br_2}$ + $0.5$ mL $\ce{KOH}$ $4$ mol/L. The reaction is finished at room temperature in $5$ minutes, and $\ce{Al^{3+}}$ ions do not interfere. $$\ce{2 Cr^{3+} + 3 Br2 + 16 OH^- -> 2 CrO4^{2-} + 6 Br^- + 8 H2O}$$ At the end of the reaction, a solution of barium chloride $\ce{BaCl2}$ or baryum hydroxide $\ce{Ba(OH)2}$ is slowly added to get rid of the chromate ions, by the reaction $$\ce{Ba^{2+} + 2 CrO4^{2-} -> BaCrO4(s)}$$ After filtration of the insoluble $\ce{BaCrO4}$, the obtained solution does not contain any more chromium, it can be acidified and the $\ce{Al^{3+}}$ ions can be titrated by EDTA.

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  • $\begingroup$ So, I need to oxidize and precipitate the Cr3+ because I can't proceed with the quantitation of Al3+ with just masking it? That's way more difficult to do in the perspective of cost and accessibility. Thank you for the answer. $\endgroup$ – Kent de los Reyes Nov 16 '20 at 2:19

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