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I was going through the concept of Boiling to reduce the potassium in Potatoes, which means $\ce{potato + water +heat -> potassium + X}$. $\ce{X}$ is potato with reduced potassium. I am more interested in the composition of Potato, which I found to be close to starch $\ce{(C6H10O5)n}$. Then I started wondering how the Potassium is present in Potato (in which form) and from where it would have come from? (the soil itself?) But I researched and found that we use Potash nowadays, which has good Potassium.

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    $\begingroup$ Potassium is present in many living things. You have potassium in you, yet are not mainly potassium by a long stretch. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Nov 12 '20 at 1:32
  • $\begingroup$ Potassium ions are natural part of electrolyte within animal and plant bodies. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Nov 12 '20 at 6:40
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Whoever told you that boiling a potato can reduce potassium has told you a fake story. You cannot evaporate potassium ions.

Potassium ion also comes from the natural soil minerals and it exists as potassium ion in water and in plants. I am sure you know that potato is an underground stem tuber. The sugars/starch come from the carbon dioxide in air. Many fertilizers contain potassium, so it is not surprising that K also comes from there.

Keep in mind that it is extremely hard to determine the total molecular composition of any natural stuff especially plants (thousands of compounds...)

Update: The OP presented a link from the Journal of Food Science (J Food Sci . 2008 Jun;73(5):H80-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2008.00782.x.) with the title "The effects of boiling and leaching on the content of potassium and other minerals in potatoes"

The results are obvious, if you boil potato chunks (not the whole potato) in water, you will dissolve a fractional amount of potassium (ions) in water. You will have to throw away the water. The same should be true for sodium and other water soluble minerals. Potassium is not a surprise.

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    $\begingroup$ Maybe the OP wasn’t referring to evaporating potassium through boiling, rather, it was the removal of potassium through diffusion from the potato to the boiling water. $\endgroup$
    – dval98
    Nov 12 '20 at 2:08
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    $\begingroup$ Probably, OP has clarify. One would rather worry about sodium rather K+, which is good. $\endgroup$
    – M. Farooq
    Nov 12 '20 at 2:11
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps, as potassium is an active element in cardiology , OP may consider potassium daily intake. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Nov 12 '20 at 6:18
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    $\begingroup$ @dval98 AFAIR ions are too large to undergo diffusion through cell walls. They are taken in by the plant via Active Transport $\endgroup$ Nov 12 '20 at 9:19
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    $\begingroup$ @AniruddhaDeb Absolutely, but the point I’m making is that’s what the heat is for. Boiling can break down the cell walls to allow ions to come out. $\endgroup$
    – dval98
    Nov 12 '20 at 9:23

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