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I really have no work to show, I don't even know how to approach answering this... so if someone can push me in the right direction, thanks.

But I did have the idea that it might have something to do with how gold isn't a strong reducing agent.

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  • $\begingroup$ Who downvoted :( ... Whoever did, was it a bad question? $\endgroup$ – Ozymandias Nov 6 '20 at 17:58
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    $\begingroup$ Why checking a gold coin with magnesium nitrate ? This compound has not too many applications, not too many uses, not too many interesting properties $\endgroup$ – Maurice Nov 6 '20 at 19:29
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The most common solution known to react with gold is a 1:3 mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid classically known as "Aqua Regia." As such, it is unlikely that magnesium nitrate alone will react with gold as it is very stable.

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    $\begingroup$ OK. That makes sense... Does gold's stability correlate to its oxidizing abilities? $\endgroup$ – Ozymandias Nov 6 '20 at 17:32
  • $\begingroup$ They are synonymous; as you stated earlier, gold is a bad reducing agent, meaning it is not easily oxidized, in a metallurgical sense, this means it is a very stable metal. $\endgroup$ – Frogbert Nov 6 '20 at 17:33

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