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For an experiment I require an aqueous solution of Iron(III). My school has the following compounds, which of them are water soluble? I believe that only Iron(III) oxide is insoluble, but I would like to verify.

  • Iron(III) oxide
  • Iron(III) oxalate
  • Iron(III) chloride-hexahydrate

Many thanks in advance.

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  • $\begingroup$ Have you thoroughly consulted the topic with textbooks, Wikipedia and Google ? $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 10:17
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, according to Google, Iron(III) Oxide is insoluble, Iron(III) Oxalate and Iron(III) Chloride-Hexahydrate are soluble. Is this correct? $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 10:21
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    $\begingroup$ Ferric oxalate is reportedly rather just slighly soluble, so for practical means, consider it insoluble. Ferric chloride hexahydrate is well soluble, routinely used in dissolving copper from printed circuit boards. You can find this quite easily. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 10:38
  • $\begingroup$ Next time, more thorough searching. $\endgroup$
    – Poutnik
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 10:41
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    $\begingroup$ Anyway the choice of Iron(III) oxalate is not happy, because it is a substance that can only be synthesized in the darkness. It is destroyed by the visible light, according to the equation $$\ce{Fe2(C2O4)3 + light -> 2 FeC2O4 + 2 CO2}$$ This reaction is even the basis of the photochemical process called heliography. $\endgroup$
    – Maurice
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

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  • Iron(III) oxide is insoluble.
  • Iron(III) oxalate is, in practical situations, insoluble.
  • Iron(III) chloride-hexahydrate is soluble.

Aditionally, Iron(III) oxalate is destroyed by visible light, and I intend to complete my experiment during the day, especially considering that involves colour changes.

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