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When making aerogel using supercritical fluids the liquid in the gel is replaced by a gas. Can this be achieved using n-Hexane as the supercritical fluid? What would the resulting gas be? Would it be safe to do or even possible?

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A supercritical fluid is just a state of matter. like solid, liquid or gas. Hexane is no more or less toxic if it has become supercritical and then brought back to standard temperature and pressure, as would water, if it changed from liquid to ice or to supercritical "steam" and back to water.

Further, supercritical $\ce{CO2}$ is used for dry-cleaning clothes, removing contaminants from printed circuit boards, and even to produce decaffeinated coffee.

So the question is not whether it's safe to use supercritical hexane, but whether there is a process that can use hexane to make an aerogel. A quick search on the web found articles on ceramic aerogels, polypropylene aerogels, and magnetic carbon-fiber aerogels using hexane in the synthesis, and you should be able to find others.

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