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https://books.google.com/books?id=aaELAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false Notice the list of elements on pages 62–63. It includes a short description of each element's "Nature under Ordinary Conditions." I am curious to know what the author might have written for elements 43, 61, 72, 75, 84, 85, 87, 89, and 91 (based on 1917 knowledge; for those which hadn't yet been discovered, some properties could be told from the element's position on the periodic table). Would people be willing to suggest period-appropriate descriptions for them?

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    $\begingroup$ Please don't underestimate 19th and 20th century scientists, they were as intelligent (perhaps more creative) as today's scientists. The scientists who discovered most of your listed elements were trained by them. $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 17 '20 at 2:09
  • $\begingroup$ I'm asking mostly because I sometimes have trouble wording things. While I'm sure the scientists of the time were as intelligent as today's scientists, I haven't seen much about which aspects of the listed elements had or hadn't been discovered yet in 1917. $\endgroup$ – user17584 Oct 17 '20 at 2:17
  • $\begingroup$ What you have to do, is to look up the original papers or documents which described the elements. See how do they describe it. Have you explored the Internet Archive? $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 17 '20 at 2:20
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    $\begingroup$ "I sometimes have trouble wording things" Could you provide an example. This might explain the context of your question which is not very clear yet. $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 17 '20 at 2:21
  • $\begingroup$ See this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_chemical_element_discoveries $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Oct 17 '20 at 4:31
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Unknown elements were discussed according to Mendeleiev's nomenclature. The prefix eka- was used for the element just under a known element, and it was dvi- for the following one, two lines under. For example, the element 31 under aluminum was celled eka-aluminum, just before it was discovered as gallium. With this same technique, the element 43 was named eka-manganese before it was discovered as technetium, and element 75 was dvi-manganese before its discovery as rhenium.

In your list, the element 61 was not expected. The 72 was eka-zirconium. The radioactive elements (Z > 83) were not expected.

Ref. : M. Fontani, M. Costa, M. Orna, The Lost Elements, Oxford University Press 2015, 530 p., ISBN 978-0-19-938334-4.

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  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this answer is that it presumes a periodic relationship, whereas the modern notation (where they make Latinized names from the digits of the atomic number) does not. Are we subtly assuming that the periodic relationships are breaking down with the new crop of much heavier unknown elements? $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Oct 17 '20 at 12:56

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