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I am trying to find the original textbook image that is the inspiration for many schematic figures showing tertiary interactions (hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, disulfide bridges). The earliest I found was in a blog, without source attribution, and is reproduced here:

enter image description here

It must be from Chapter 8 of some textbook. The same blog shows other figures and tables from the same textbook, I think, for example:

enter image description here

The quantitative nature of the table points at a upper-level text (rather than the last chapter of organic chemistry, or a biology introductory text). The black and white figure (intended as such as judged by the rastering of the gray shade) suggests 1960s or early 1970s. There is a picture of the structure of hemoglobin in another figure (a schematic of a wood slab layer model, and a low resolution model next to it), so it cannot be written earlier than 1959.

I don't have access to a library with old textbooks at the moment, so I am asking here.

I did find a newer colorized version (with at least one mistake) here:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Google books and images do not bring up any similar result. It more or less looks like an Indian textbook. Have you seen the identical figure elsewhere besides this blog? $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 16 '20 at 13:21
  • $\begingroup$ I checked my 1977 copy of Metzler's biochemistry, and it's not that. By 77 they seem to have been using more advanced models for their hemoglobin drawings, so that could help set the limits on the book's age. $\endgroup$ – user137 Oct 16 '20 at 13:28
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    $\begingroup$ After more thinking: not getting to basic protein structure info until chapter 8 suggests that it's a general biology textbook rather than specific to biochemistry? $\endgroup$ – Andrew Oct 16 '20 at 13:45
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    $\begingroup$ @Andrew Stryer (foreword Oct 1974 / print 1975 by WH Freeman, San Francisco) already was polychrome in representing formulae / diagrams. Chapter 4 «Hemoglobin. An allosteric protein» (p. 21) shows it with yellow $\alpha$-chains, blue $\beta$ chains, and red heme groups as copy from a publication by Perutz himself (1964, Scientific American) from a very different perspective than the one used in the blog. Thus, Stryker1975 is unlikely. (I can't confirm the elder books by Lehninger edited, but then, await chapter 8 to go show proteins is unlikely for the Principles, too.) $\endgroup$ – Buttonwood Oct 16 '20 at 14:09
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    $\begingroup$ @M.Farooq I have seen many newer versions, so I think it was read by folks in many countries, including UK and US (because those are the source of the newer versions). $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Oct 16 '20 at 14:34
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The illustration is likely taken from a later edition of Baum's Introduction to organic and biological chemistry. The first edition [1, p. 292] presents nearly identical illustration under a different number alongside with a note that the image was adapted from Bennett's Graphic Biochemistry [2]:

Figure 13.10 from Baum's Introduction to organic and biological chemistry

Unfortunately, at the moment (2020-10-16) [1] is available on The Internet Archive only for a limited amount of time for borrowing, and I was unable to find a full-text source for [2].

References

  1. Stuart J. Baum. Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry, 1st ed.; Macmillan: London, 1970.
  2. Bennett T. P. Graphic Biochemistry. The Chemistry of Biological Molecules; Macmillan, 1968; Vol. 1.
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    $\begingroup$ @karsten theis My local library has the Bennett book. I could check it out and post images if you can’t get a copy yourself $\endgroup$ – Andrew Oct 17 '20 at 0:51
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    $\begingroup$ @Andrew Not necessary, but thanks for the generous offer. I am happy to have the source confirmed. I was using the colorized version (with the mistakes) in my slides (from Ball, Hill, Scott, The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, which also has a Flatworld, a Saylor and a Libretext version). $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Oct 17 '20 at 1:02
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    $\begingroup$ @andselisk, (+1): Could you share how you did an image search? $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 17 '20 at 3:18
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    $\begingroup$ @M.Farooq Image search was of no help for me. I used Google Books to search for the quoted parts of the caption (such as "bonds that stabilize the tertiary structure of proteins"), and then sorted the results from older to newer. This helped to discover Baum's Introduction to organic and biological chemistry. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Oct 17 '20 at 5:45
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the information. $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Oct 17 '20 at 12:52

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