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In the book of Molecular Cell Biology (Big Alberts) by Alberts, at page 46, it is stated that

Acids—especially weak acids—will give up their protons more readily if the concentration of > H3O+ in solution is low and will tend to receive them back if the concentration in solution is high.

Does this mean that, in a solution with high pH, the weaker acids will behave like a strong acids in water, in the sense that they will be more inclided to give up their protons compared to strong acids?

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When the ratio of conjugate base concenteration to conjugate acid concenteration is more than 1000 , we say that the dissociation of acid is complete.

According to Henderson–Hasselbalch equation the ratio of conjugate base concenteration to conjugate acid concenteration gets more than 1000 , when PH-PKa is more than 3.

For strong acids, this ratio is more than 1000 in PH>2 (( actually it is true for most strong acids )) , but for weak acids , there is no specefic PH . Actually, higher PH , higher dissociation ratio.

So ,when the PH gets higher, the dissiciation ratio gets greater and more poroton will be given up.

Actually, when PH-PKa gets more than 3 for weak acids , they behave like strong acids and allmost all of the acid will dissociate.

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