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What is the melting point of egg yolk?

Well, generally, when we break an egg, the yolk is in liquid state. After we pour it on a pan, the egg starts to cook and it hardens. My question is, can an egg melt/boil ?

What are the conditions to be imposed?

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    $\begingroup$ Most foods never melt. Instead, they decompose. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Oct 8 '20 at 10:19
  • $\begingroup$ @IvanNeretin that does mean that the egg does not has a definite melting point? since it'll split up? $\endgroup$ – user99682 Oct 8 '20 at 10:20
  • $\begingroup$ That's right, it doesn't melt at all. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Oct 8 '20 at 12:25
  • $\begingroup$ Defined melting point requires pure substance or in some cases well defined mixture of few components, which do not decompose at melting temperature. Egg yolk is not such a case. $\endgroup$ – Poutnik Oct 8 '20 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ Egg yolk is a complex mixture including a lot of proteins. Heating proteins does not melt them, it causes them to denature or unfold. Once denatured, the proteins interact to form a gel-like solid. If you continue to heat up the solid, it will burn. $\endgroup$ – user137 Oct 8 '20 at 18:44
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As Poutnik said, the melting point is well defined for pure substances. In the case of egg yolk, it is not a pure substance and also when you heat it, some molecules decompose. So we can't measure or even define a melting point for it. Also, the temperature is not constant, when the egg is melting.

A substances' phase doesn't get influenced only by temperature. Maybe it is strange that heating the egg yolk in a pan, makes it to behave like a solid. Actually, some complex changes in intermolecular forces are getting done.

If you want to cause an egg yolk to melt, I think that the only work to do is to heat it under the normal pressure.

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