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Aniline structure with 13-C values

A $\ce{^{13}C}$-NMR of aniline shows that the carbons further from the $\ce{-NH2}$ group are more downfield than the ones near the top of the benzene ring. If electronegative atoms like nitrogen have a deshielding effect on nearby Carbons, why is this the case? Is it because of dipole vectors?

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    $\begingroup$ I strongly suggest using deshielded/shielded instead of downfield/upfield, as the latter terms are historical relics from an old way of doing NMR (continuous wave). Deshielded/shielded is really more intuitive and easily relatable to other chemistry concepts. $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Oct 1 '20 at 9:39
  • $\begingroup$ Noted, thank you $\endgroup$ – John Boon Oct 1 '20 at 19:33
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Although the nitrogen atom is more electronegative than carbon, nitrogen will readily share its electron pair, allowing one to draw a resonance structure where the nitrogen is donating electron density into the ring. Therefore, the donating of the lone pair of electrons overcomes the inductive effects arising from the difference in electronegativity.

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