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Litmus papers are used to test acidity and alkalinity of a fluid. Are there other paper-based tools to test for other stuff like dissolved oxygen, presence of toxicity, electric potential etc?

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    $\begingroup$ Hi, Welcome to Chemistry SE. This is good question, it reminded me of paper based battery indicator that worked just like mercury-type thermometer so when the battery potential is full the paper showed full range and if the battery is low then partial range. I can also imagine the plastic based coating on the mugs that turns colorless revealing a picture when hot fluid is poured, there are inexpensive methods to test for various properties. $\endgroup$ – metron Sep 24 at 19:16
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    $\begingroup$ Pregnancy test kits. Lead paint test kits. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 24 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, available at your local hardware store. Moisten and wipe a painted object, turns color if lead is picked up from it. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 24 at 19:39
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    $\begingroup$ @JhonnyS, I've enlarged the comment a bit and made it an answer. $\endgroup$ – DrMoishe Pippik Sep 27 at 1:09
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    $\begingroup$ There are paper thermometers (which actually employ a type of liquid crystals) that change colour and show temperature $\endgroup$ – Shoubhik R Maiti Sep 27 at 21:04
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It's easy to find a slew of test papers and strips online. For example, a quick search of Amazon for "test papers" turned up chlorine test strips for pools and sanitation, glucose test strips for diabetes, phenylthiourea genetic-linked taste tests, UV-C dose test cards, lead acetate paper test for $\ce{H2S}$, WBC and nitrite test strips for UTI... You could write a paper on all the test papers available.

Increasingly, medicine is making use of paper tests because of ease of distribution, storage and use, particularly important in rural location and during emergencies.

BTW, you can make a test paper for polarity testing, and for detection of peroxides, by dipping filter paper into a suspension of starch and potassium iodide, $\ce{KI}$, rather than buy it. Dampen and use it as you would a potato to determine the polarity of an electric cell.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot! Quite valuable indeed. $\endgroup$ – JhonnyS Sep 27 at 19:16

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