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I am curious as that I know that various materials can be subjected to fragility from ductile-brittle transition via temperature, where an item is more likely to fracture of shatter such as increase in strain.

I was wondering, what would be considered the equivalence for regular ice, I do not mean at 0 degrees Celsius where water becomes ice. I mean where it would likely cause ice to shatter more easily at lower temperatures?

Here are some links I found:

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    $\begingroup$ And things like sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0956715193903915 - there are a lot of articles on the ductile-brittle transition in ice. So, what are you asking for that the articles don't address? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 17 at 14:26
  • $\begingroup$ @JonCuster guess I am trying to get a better understanding about at what point would ice be considered brittle that it would fracture or shatter easily with little effort. $\endgroup$ – C. Jordan Sep 17 at 15:39
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not a fracture mechanics person (although I know quite a few), but from glancing through the papers the answer is, well, complicated. This is not particularly surprising since brittle-to-ductile transitions and what they mean for a given mechanical loading are generally quite complicated as well. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Sep 17 at 15:49
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    $\begingroup$ "without energy it cannot give cohesion" is a fundamental misunderstanding. It takes energy to separate things, not keep them together. For example, we add energy to get from solid to gas. Interactions between molecules release energy, so lowest energy forms are solids $\endgroup$ – Andrew Sep 17 at 16:17
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    $\begingroup$ yes. The form of solid H2O at absolute 0 has even less internal energy than the crystals that form initially at 0 C. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Sep 17 at 19:13
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One complication is that ice, unlike most solids, liquefies under pressure. At the grain boundaries, at higher temperature, ice can melt under strain and resolidify as the strain is relieved by the melting, leading to gradual deformation. So under gradual strain, ice is ductile. As mentioned in comments, this is hard to model.

BTW, ice was used to construct Pykrete boats during World War II, though they never reached the theater of war. It's safe to assume the properties were determined empirically.

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