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I have read that the color of colloid depends upon the wavelength of light scattered by the dispersed phase and also in the sense in which the receiver receives the light.

If all of this depends on wavelength scattered and in the sense we see, then what is the actual color of a colloid?

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    $\begingroup$ Gold can produce colloids which are blue or red. So there is no simple relationship between the color of the bulk substance and the colloid made by dispersing this substance in tiny particules. $\endgroup$ – Maurice Aug 24 '20 at 7:45
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Colloidal solutions scatter light of different wavelenghts in different directions, and that's also dependent on the size(!) of the colloidal particles.

To see any scattering at all, there only has to be a difference in the refractive index of pure solution and dissolved particles.

The individual colour (i.e. absorption spectrum) of the particles is irrelevant to the scattering, but of course it additionally changes the colour that you see. Absorbed light does not get scattered, obviously.

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