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A trivial research in atoms and their basic theories led me to this term: "isotones"
Nuclides sharing the same number of neutrons but different atomic numbers.
A simple request or shall I say, quest:
please indicate me to any feasible similarities existing between isotones and please, DO NOT use jargon.

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Chemistry is determined entirely by electron interactions. Since the number of electrons in an atom is determined by the number of protons in the nucleus, the atomic number (number of protons) is what defines the chemical behavior of a given element. This means that in terms of chemical properties, isotones would have no similarities unless they happened to be in the same group (column) of the periodic table, but that would be a coincidence and would have nothing to do with the number of neutrons.

As DavePhD and ron said, the nuclear stability could be similar, since nuclear stability has a lot to do with the total number of nucleons (neutrons + protons) as well as the relative proportion of protons to neutrons. The wikipedia article on isotones discusses stability in a little more detail.

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I suspect that having the same number of neutrons may mean something at the nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics level, but in terms of general chemistry, including inorganic, organic and biochemistry, it's all about the number of electrons and protons. So I don't think that isotones would show any differences in terms of (non-nuclear) reaction chemistry.

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In chemistry, if an atom has a closed valence electron shell, as do the noble gases, it is particularly stable.

Similarly, there is a shell model of the nucleus.

Certain numbers of neutrons (and also protons) are referred to as magic numbers: 2,8,20,28,50,82,126, all even numbers, because nuclei with these numbers of neutrons (or protons) are particularly stable.

The similarity between isotones is that stability of a nucleus is somewhat correlated with the number of neutrons.

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