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I have been searching for quite some time now, but I feel like it is impossible to find some sort of chart where I can determine which characterization method (microscopy, spectroscopy, electrochemical, DMA etc.) is the best in which situation. There are so many methods and an overview would really help me to understand them better.

Does anyone know if a book or a site provides such an overview? I am pretty desperate, that's why I'm asking it here.

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    $\begingroup$ The entire scientific literature contains that information. Scientists ask a question, and they choose multiple methods to get closer to an answer. So every paper would be a row in your table, the cell with the "situation" would be the entire introduction to the paper, and the methods section would not tell you which single method is the best, but which set of methods they decided to use (based on expertise, availability, cost and expected outcomes). $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Jul 29 '20 at 13:36
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, I understand that. I have been reading a lot of papers to gain some insight. But I mean it would be nice to have some kind of overview of the methods and a flowchart that determines what would be a good option. I can make it myself, and probably will, but it seems odd that there isn't already such a thing in the literature. $\endgroup$ – Paperreader Jul 29 '20 at 17:38
  • $\begingroup$ For molecular biology, there is a series often just called Methods. (see springer.com/series/7651). I don't know whether material sciences has something similar. The corresponding wikipedia article has a couple of references that might be useful: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Characterization_(materials_science) $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Jul 29 '20 at 21:27
  • $\begingroup$ You might find such a table for a more focused set of materials, such as researchgate.net/profile/Venkata_Narayana_Kalevaru_Dr/… $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Jul 29 '20 at 21:30
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There is a collection available at Libretexts.org, by students and faculty from Franklin & Marshall College. The intent is to provide a quick overview for readers of the literature (rather than practitioners doing the experiments), so the focus is the type of result each method yields, and how to interpret it.

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