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My textbook says

They will then fill the $2s$ subshell, and then the $2p$ subshell...

Yet half of ChemSE refers to $s,p,d,f$ as "subshells" and the other half seems to refer to $1s, 2p...$ for example, as "subshells" as well, even in two answers to the same question.

So is, for example, $s$ a subshell, or $2s$ a subshell?

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    $\begingroup$ Am I Ivan or Ivan Neretin? $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 28 at 5:46
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    $\begingroup$ @IvanNeretin You are ИСН:) $\endgroup$ – andselisk Jun 28 at 8:09
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    $\begingroup$ Terms a shell and a subshell are rather obsolete.2 means the orbital with quantum number n=2, p means the orbital with quantum number l=0. By the particular subshell were considered orbitals with the particular quantum numbers n and l. $\endgroup$ – Poutnik Jun 28 at 11:53
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    $\begingroup$ @andselisk You knew! $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 28 at 12:26
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Terms a shell and a subshell are rather obsolete. 2 in 2p means the orbital has the quantum number n=2, p in 2p means the orbital has the quantum number $\ell$=0.

By the particular subshell were considered orbitals with the particular quantum numbers n and l.

So s, p, d, f are particular groups of "subshells", each sharing the common value of the quantum number $\ell$=0,1,2,3, while 1s, 2p,.. are the particular "subshells".

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