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As we know that acid releases proton (H+ ion) when dipped in water hydrogen has a proton and electron only . To form H+ hydrogen releases 1 electron and it becomes proton. But when Acid reacts with metals hydrogen ion reacts with another hydrogen ion ( which is nothing but proton ) to form hydrogen gas then how can it be possible that one proton reacts with another proton to form hydrogen gas?

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    $\begingroup$ They can't, of course. One proton is positively charged, and so is another. There must be something else to it. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 16 at 18:09
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A proton does not react with another proton, as you state. It reacts with a metal. And this metal gives one electron to one proton. This makes a Hydrogen atom, then a Hydrogen molecule. Finally the metal becomes a positively charged cation, which passes into solution

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Usually there is some form of a redox reaction happening there, for example like $$\ce{M(s) + 2H+(aq) \to M^{2+} (aq) + H2(g)}$$ where $M$ is just some metal (like copper, iron, etc...) reducing hydrogen to its elemental/gaseous form.

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