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In my chemistry lab, I have a vial of Sodium Hydrogen Sulfate (Sodium Bisulfate). I've noticed that when I take a spoonful using a spatula, the spatula gets covered in many tiny droplets, and the lid of the vial always has a layer of tiny droplets on the inside.

Does the Sodium Hydrogen Sulfate (Sodium Bisulfate) react in any way to produce this moisture? Is this to do with the salt being hydrous or anhydrous?

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    $\begingroup$ I guess moisture comes from the air. $\endgroup$ Jun 1 '20 at 16:15
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Does the Sodium Hydrogen Sulfate (Sodium Bisulfate) react in any way to produce this moisture?

This process is called deliquescence (mouthful word). This process is not specific to your salt, even table salt, NaCl, would do the same in a humid environment e.g. on a rainy day. This has nothing to do with the state of hydrated or anhydrous salt. It is the nature of the compound.

The opposite of this phenomenon is efflorescence. The hydrated salt becomes dry when exposed to air.

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