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Quantum particles are never objects but are always waves. But do they have mass or can they carry mass?

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think all the downvotes without suggestions are particualrly helpful $\endgroup$ – LigninPauling May 28 '20 at 15:40
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    $\begingroup$ @LigninPauling agreed. While perhaps OP may have found the answer by doing more digging before asking (not saying they didn’t), this type of question could help someone in the future. $\endgroup$ – jezzo May 28 '20 at 16:02
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    $\begingroup$ I'm only suggesting that those who downvote should explain why they dislike the question rather than simply downvoting. I thought your answer below was very useful. $\endgroup$ – LigninPauling May 28 '20 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ @LigninPauling, There are persistent pests which automatically down vote without having the courtesy to say why? Most likely they have nothing positive to say. $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq May 29 '20 at 0:20
  • $\begingroup$ You are made of quantum particles, i.e atoms. Wave particle duality means that in some experiments designed to show wave behaviour, this is observed (i.e. double slit experiment on atoms and molecules), in others, particle behaviour is observed in experiments designed to measure this, i.e. mass spectrometer. But not both behaviours observed at the same time. $\endgroup$ – porphyrin May 29 '20 at 7:33
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welcome to the chemistry StackExchange! I think it would be helpful for you to review the wikipedia page on particle-wave duality. If you have access to a textbook on the origins of quantum mechanics, that would help clear things up,too.

The quantum mechanical model for particles states they have both particle-like and wave-like behavior, so it is incorrect to say they are never particles, which is what I assume you mean by "objects".

At the most fundamental level, quantum mechanics is just another tool with which to view and understand the world around us. It's an especially useful tool when we are looking at things in very fine detail (let's say, usually < $10^{-7}$ m). So, we can look at a given particle from the framework of classical mechanics or from the framework of quantum mechanics. This is an important point, because it is not quantum or classical mechanics that attributes mass to the particle. Rather, the particle had that mass to begin with.

So, to answer your question: A quantum mechanical treatment neither prescribes nor removes mass from a particle or an object. A photon is massless, a proton has mass, and that's that!

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  • $\begingroup$ A photon has zero rest mass, but has momentum / mass due to energy mass equality. $\endgroup$ – porphyrin May 29 '20 at 7:33
  • $\begingroup$ Momentum can exist without mass. And photons do not have mass, they can only have relativistic mass. $\endgroup$ – jezzo May 29 '20 at 13:11

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