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How would one go about naming inter-metallic (specifically, transition post-transition) compounds containing tin and lead?

It is usually easy figuring out the naming of such compounds as they follow a simple naming convention, for example ruthenium germanide, niobium aluminiumide and so on.

But what about tin? Would you get ruthenium stannide? Stannumide? Or something completely different? Same goes for lead, but I feel like I've heard the name aurous plumbide referring to $\ce{AuPb2}$ before.

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  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron Though Sb isn't unreasonable to include? 'Stibnide'? $\endgroup$
    – hBy2Py
    May 21 '20 at 19:23
  • $\begingroup$ @ChristianS.O. -- AFAIK neither Sn nor Pb is a transition metal, so I removed that tag. $\endgroup$
    – hBy2Py
    May 21 '20 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ Worked in metallurgy ( R&D Dept) my whole career and this problem never came up. Generally called intermetalllics and maybe a likely composition. $\endgroup$ May 21 '20 at 19:40
  • $\begingroup$ @hBy2Py Sb would be antimonide, example Nickel Antimonide $\endgroup$ May 22 '20 at 11:11
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After doing some digging I've found evidence to support that tin based inter-metallic compounds should be named 'stannide' such as in the paper by Fickenscher et al. [1].

Reference

  1. Fickenscher, T.; Rodewald, U. C.; Niehaus, O.; Gerke, B.; Haverkamp, S.; Eckert, H.; Pöttgen, R. The Stannides $\ce{RE3Au6Sn5}$ $(\ce{RE} = \ce{La}, \ce{Ce}, \ce{Pr}, \ce{Nd}, \ce{Sm})$ – Synthesis, Structure, Magnetic Properties and $\ce{^{119}Sn}$ Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Zeitschrift für Naturforschung B 2015, 70 (6), 425–434. DOI: 10.1515/znb-2015-0050.
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