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I have noticed that making mimosas, the champagne fizzes more than just pouring it into a flute. Likewise, pouring beer onto citrus fruit or strawberries fizzes a lot. My theory is that the pH drop associated with the acidic fruit causes the solubility of CO2 to decrease and hence, the fizz. Can anyone verify this?

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All carbonated drinks are oversaturated solutions of $\ce{CO2(g)}$. Pouring over fruits lead to contact with many residual air bubbles, which serve as fizzing places for $\ce{CO2(aq) -> CO2(g)}$.

It is more or less the same as the ( previously already opened ) drink shaking, where violent fizzing occurs as well.

It is a similar process activation, like if you bend the activation chaff in a pocket heater with molten $\ce{CH3COONa \cdot 3 H2O}$, or if you pour overcooled water from a freezer ( see YouTube ) and watch fast ice growing.

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