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I am trying to glue glass sheets together to make a sealed 13" x 13" x 13" box. Inside this box there would be acetone gas used to melt 3D printed parts to make them more durable. Acetone will remove just about any type of adhesive I know and I was wondering if there is anything out there that would not react to acetone?

If you are going to send me the questions that was posted on this website titled "Is there a paper glue that is NOT dissolved by acetone?" don't send it, because I've seen it and the thing he suggested was to use tape, which wouldn't work because not only would it be very difficult to cover all the inside corners with tape to seal off the acetone gas from escaping, the acetone gas would either way slowly remove the tape away from the glass because it would seep under the edges of the tape.

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    $\begingroup$ It would be very difficult to put tape on the inside corners of the glass to completely prevent the acetone from seeping through and even if I do manage to do so, the acetone would remove the tape slowly over time. $\endgroup$ – daniel May 11 '20 at 21:49
  • $\begingroup$ Ohk, then I am retracting my flag. Still, if it helps, Is there a paper glue that is NOT dissolved by acetone? $\endgroup$ – Zenix May 11 '20 at 23:34
  • $\begingroup$ How big a part are you working with? I was wondering if a gallon jar would work. $\endgroup$ – MaxW May 12 '20 at 1:57
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    $\begingroup$ fusing the glass together would be a bit difficult to do. Acetone removes epoxy so I would imagine it would still do the same to epoxy cement, but I will still run some tests. For the sizing of the 3d printed parts I have to be able to fit things that are at most 12x12x12". And could people please stop posting the other post titled "is there a paper glue that is not dissolved by acetone" because that does not help for two reasons. first of all his suggestion is for short term use, over time acetone will remove tape and second, it would be extremely difficult to cover all that cracks with tape. $\endgroup$ – daniel May 12 '20 at 21:30
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    $\begingroup$ It is a notably different question to the flagged duplicate not least because there is little overlap between glues used for paper and glues used for glass. I used to make filtering devices for air-sensitive chemistry in a lab by gluing glass to long metal tubes. The glue survived exposure to most solvents, though perhaps not permanently. $\endgroup$ – matt_black May 13 '20 at 20:37

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