1
$\begingroup$

I'm looking for a fluorophore with exceptionally long lifetime to use in an oxygen optode (the longer the lifetime the less timing precision needed in the electronics).

So far the longest I have encountered in my searches is 600nS for Ru(bpy)3[PF6]2 found in this table but that resource appears less than exhaustive; Is there a more comprehensive data sources available where I could compare lifetimes and relevant wavelengths for all known fluorophors?

.. also just to clarrify the fluorophore needs to undergo quenching by oxygen ...

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Then you're rather looking for phosphorescence. $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    May 5 '20 at 18:04
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Uranyl ion has a fluorescence lifetime of about 1.5 microseconds: Catalysis of ionic reactions by polyelectrolytes. III. Quenching of uranyl ion fluorescence by iron(II) ions in poly(vinylsulfonic acid) solution, Herbert MorawetzIssam A. I. Taha Cite this: J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1971, 93, 4, 829-833 Publication Date:February 1, 1971 doi.org/10.1021/ja00733a005 $\endgroup$
    – Ed V
    May 5 '20 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, while heartening to find the microseconds lifetime is not out of the realm of possibilities - Uranyl is a bit to exotic for my purposes (the end product needs to be compatible with international and domestic postal services) $\endgroup$
    – norlesh
    May 5 '20 at 19:08
  • $\begingroup$ You might consider Europium or Terbium compounds. Eu3+ and Tb3+ complexes can have long lifetimes in the range of hundreds of microseconds to milliseconds (tcichemicals.com/US/en/c/10226). $\endgroup$
    – BalooRM
    May 5 '20 at 21:54
1
$\begingroup$

According to the article Indicators for optical oxygen sensors; Michela Quaranta, Sergey M. Borisov, Ingo Klimant

Among all the indicators that have been used for optical oxygen sensors, Pt(II) and Pd(II) porphyrins are the mostpopular luminophores since they possess strong phosphorescence at room temperature, moderate to high molar absorption coefficients and large Stokes’shifts. Additionally, phosphorescence lifetimes are rather long (microsecond to millisecond) and can be tuned by varying the nature of the central atom.

They then go on to include a table (Table 3 on page 131) of 36 dyes based on that chemistry, 35 with lifetimes in the microseconds and 1 (PdTFPP) with a lifetime of 1.65 milliseconds.

In relation to my quest for a data source to compare fluorophors I managed to stumble upon the website fluorophores.org that currently includes 952 substances and can be filtered by excitation, emission, quantum yield, and lifetime parameters.

$\endgroup$
7
  • $\begingroup$ What is your analytical application? You mentioned oxygen optode but where do you plan to use it. $\endgroup$
    – M. Farooq
    May 6 '20 at 4:32
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is it something like this commercial product oxysense.com/how-oxysense-works.html? $\endgroup$
    – M. Farooq
    May 6 '20 at 4:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ On first glance that appears to be EXACTLY what I need! Do you know of any commercial products that use this in there packaging so I could test it out? I will be contacting the company directly but who knows how long that will take. $\endgroup$
    – norlesh
    May 6 '20 at 5:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks, according to OxySense's patent (US20070243618A1) they use a ruthenium based fluorophore: "The present invention provides a ruthenium-based luminescence indicator composition that includes a tris-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline ruthenium(II) compound and one or more dioctylphthalate dispersed within a gas permeable polyacrylate matrix. The tris-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline ruthenium(II) compound has a fluorescence lifetime that is affected by exposure to one or more gases and exposure to the one or more gases is monitored" $\endgroup$
    – norlesh
    May 6 '20 at 5:19
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Great. So you have clues now to see the new directions. $\endgroup$
    – M. Farooq
    May 6 '20 at 5:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.