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In this paper (https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2017/ra/c7ra05125e) and a few others, chemists create PAA-coated silver nanoparticles in a colloidal conductive ink. (Mods - I cant seem to create an embedded underline link on the mobile site - sorry)

My two favorite papers on this subject use almost exactly the same method -- reduction of silver nitrate using monoethanolamine. However, because monoethanolamine is a restricted material, I can't get my hands on it. I have just about every step in the experiment accounted for except this material.

I've tried making silver nanoparticles before using sodium borohydride. It requires careful synthesis to avoid a side reaction with water. Also, the paper linked above mentions sodium borohydride as leaving "residue". What does that mean exactly?

Can very concentrated sodium borohydride be used as a drop-in replacement for monoethanolamine in this method of synthesis? If not, what are my options for conducting this procedure to obtain PAA-coated nanoparticles?

Is there any way to start with micron sized silver particles and coat them with PAA? Such that reduction isnt necessary?

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