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Is there a plastic that's clear, acetone resistant, and ideally sold in sheet stock that's ~1/8" or 1/4" thick? Both acrylic and polycarbonate are out, they turn cloudy on contact with acetone. I tried a piece of PETG and it was better, but still turned fairly cloudy after a few seconds. I don't need continuous service, but I need it to still look decent if it gets wiped down with acetone.

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According to Palstics International's Chemical Resistance Chart, the A-rated plastics (no solvent attack) towards acetone are:

Among these, polypropylene appears to be the only plastic that satisfies all criteria.

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    $\begingroup$ +1 iPP can be made to crystallise in structures smaller than optical wavelenght. Its done with comonomer contents and/or tacticity defects in a small percent range and/or a lot of nucleating agents. $\endgroup$ – Karl Jan 8 at 22:43
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    $\begingroup$ From what I can tell, clear polypropylene is biaxially oriented polypropylene, it looks like it gets stretched in 2 directions while being formed. I think this process is mostly used for thinner packaging material, something a few mil thick. I wasn't able to find anything in sheet form that's an 1/8" or 1/4" thick. $\endgroup$ – Shawn Jan 16 at 4:36
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    $\begingroup$ @Shawn You are correct, getting optically clear or even just transparent PP 1/8" sheet isn't trivial. If semi-transparent white PP sheet isn't an option, then one should probably look further for less common proprietary plastics. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Jan 16 at 4:52
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I think the only real option for this is a clear plastic sheet that's had a chemical resistant thin film applied to the faces. One commercially available example is Makrolon AR2, it's polycarbonate with some proprietary coating that's listed as having >24hrs resistance to acetone and a few other chemicals.

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Alternatively, cast your own sheet (or straight your close-to-final piece) using a mold from a chemical resistant 2 part epoxy. Usually, difunctional or polyfunctional amine hardeners confer chemical/temperature resistance, causing a polymerization in a 3D cross-linked network (it also means saying goodbye to thermoplasticity).

Google search - customize it for the TLD/geo area you live in.

Example of a result that works for me (haven't use it yet, but I had a chat with a sale representative and confirmed that it maintains its clear/mechanical resistance when using with acetone after the cure).

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