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Generally, we know that triplet carbene is more stable than singlet. But in my book, it is written that singlet difluorocarbene is more stable than triplet difluorocarbene. What's the reason for it?

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So generally singlet is less stable as triplet has half-filled orbitals which leads to stability.

However whenever a group that can give electrons by back donation (examples being lone pair carriers like $\ce{-OH},$ $\ce{-NH2},$ etc. are attached, they stabilise the singlet by back donation of their lone pair into the vacant orbital of the singlet carbene.

This is similar to back bonding in $\ce{BF3}.$

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Singlet carbene has a vacant p orbital. Whereas triplet carbene doesn't. Same with the case of singlet and triplet difluorocarbene. Due to the availability of vacant orbital back bond is established between F and C singlet, hence more stable.

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