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Consider a sample of $\ce{Ca(NO3)2.10H2O}$. To remove water, I need to heat it to $\pu{100 ^\circ C},$ but will this high temperature decompose it or will I get the anhydrous salt?

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  • $\begingroup$ This information is readily available on the internet, e.g. Wikipedia. $\endgroup$ – DrMoishe Pippik Dec 31 '19 at 4:06
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    $\begingroup$ Are you sure it's a calcium nitrate decahydrate and not a tetrahydrate? Or are you asking about ammonium calcium nitrate decahydrate? $\endgroup$ – andselisk Dec 31 '19 at 7:35
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Calcium nitrate exists under three forms : 1) $\ce{Ca(NO3)}_2 $ which melts at 361°C; 2) $\ce{Ca(NO3)}_2$$·\ 3 $$\ce{H_2O}$, which is not commercial and melts at 51°C ; 3) $\ce{Ca(NO3)}_2$$·\ 4 $$\ce{H_2O}$ which is commercially available and melts at 43°C. It looses its water at 132°C and is deliquescent. The decahydrate that you mention does not exist.

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    $\begingroup$ It would be even a better answer if it were backed up by a reputable source. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Dec 31 '19 at 12:46

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