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I want to heat the air with non-aqueous, non-toxic and non-solvable-in-air liquid (with very low relative pressure in air). Is there any such liquid exists?

It would be great if the boiling point of the liquid would be 110 °C.

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    $\begingroup$ Water seems to be fine. What do you mean by non-solube in air? $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Dec 12 '19 at 10:06
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    $\begingroup$ Why not just get an oil filled heater? An electric coil heats the oil in a sealed metal radiator which then radiates the heat into the room. (The oil can't get hot enough to catch something else on fire....) $\endgroup$ – MaxW Dec 12 '19 at 10:23
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    $\begingroup$ If the boiling point of the liquid is $\pu{110^\circ C}$, then by definition the liquid’s partial pressure at $\pu{110^\circ C}$ is $\pu{1013mbar}$ which means its partial pressure at lower temperatures will typically be far, far away from not noticable. $\endgroup$ – Jan Dec 12 '19 at 16:45
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    $\begingroup$ I think you are under the impression that vapor pressure is a function of it's "solubility" in the head-space gas. This is not the case. For example, water has the same boiling point under air as it does under helium. Confusion is often caused here by the terminology that at 100% humidity, the air is "saturated" with water or that the air can't "hold" any more water. This makes it sound like air absorbs water vapor, as you say, which it does not. $\endgroup$ – airhuff Dec 13 '19 at 2:08
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks all. I don't need a non-aqueous, non-toxic and non-solvable-in-air liquid with exactly 110 °C. I state this temperature because it's the minimum temperature which satisfies my conditions. so the boiling point of the liquid could be 500 °C or above. $\endgroup$ – MEng Dec 13 '19 at 6:55
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You may look at silicon Si and its derivatives. For example, the ethoxytriethylsilicane, or triethylsilicol ethyl ether is boiling at 153 °C. Or the tetraethylsilicane is also boiling at 153 °C. This last substance is used as a reference in NMR spectroscopy.

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