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When water boils and you suddenly shut the heat off, a lot of steam arises from it just after you shut the heat off. Why this happens, I thought that maybe water condenzes very fast in small droplets so they get flown up?

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    $\begingroup$ This is explained at StackExchange Physics: physics.stackexchange.com/q/4168 $\endgroup$ – Karsten Theis Nov 24 '19 at 22:01
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    $\begingroup$ Close voters: A similar question was very well received on physics (multiple times in fact). While we don't need to rehash the same points here, I don't see how the question is unclear. $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Nov 25 '19 at 16:15
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Even water below boiling point has high partial vapour tension.

The gas containing mostly vapour, being hot and having low average molecular mass, has significantly lower density than air. Therefore, it raises up.

At contact with air, it quickly cools down and the vapour condensates.

The droplets are small enough to be taken upwards by the strong thermal vertical convection.

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