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If I'm drawing a Bohr model of Neon, the middle is the nucleus, the first energy level contains 2 electrons. The second level contains 8 electrons. 8+2= 10, Neon's atomic number. But then what are the atomic orbitals, like s, p, d, and f. Where do they come in? Are they completely different from the energy level?

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  • $\begingroup$ Things like s, p, d, and f never come into the Bohr model. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Aug 30 '19 at 6:38
  • $\begingroup$ There is always a number before the letters $s, p, d, f$. It tells you which Bohr shell youre in. $\endgroup$ – Karl Aug 30 '19 at 6:54
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Neon's atomic number. But then what are the atomic orbitals, like s, p, d, and f. Where do they come in? Are they completely different from the energy level?

Atomic theory was developed in stages almost a century ago. Bohr's model is the simplest version of hydrogen atom. General chemistry textbooks write rarely mention the Sommerfeld's model from which the concept of orbital angular momentum originated on elliptical paths (recall that a circle of Bohr's model is a special ellipse). Sommerfeld model model explained more features of the hydrogen spectrum. After Sommerfeld the next person was Schrodinger who proposed the H atom in terms of probabilities of finding electrons rather than fixed orbits.

In short, s, p, d, f come into play in more advanced models of Sommerfeld. Bohr was the first one to talk about electronic configurations for multielectron atoms.

Sommerfeld' model

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm sorry, so what you mean is: Neon's electron configuration, [He] 2s2 2p6, has nothing to do with me drawing 2 electrons on the first energy level, then 8 on the second energy level. These things aren't related. Is that what you mean? I'm sorry, I just want to clarify. $\endgroup$ – Dylan Sep 4 '19 at 0:46
  • $\begingroup$ No need to be sorry, these are genuine questions which kept the best minds in physics busy. The picture of 2 electrons in the first shell and 8 in the second is a primitive picture. This picture is not enough to explain the experimental spectrum. [He]$2s^22p^6$ is an advanced version of that primitive model. $\endgroup$ – M. Farooq Sep 4 '19 at 2:04

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