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Are there other mixtures than piranha solution with similiar or better ability to completely and readily oxidize organic matter? Perhaps peracetic/performic acid?

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closed as too broad by Mithoron, Mathew Mahindaratne, DrMoishe Pippik, Jon Custer, Todd Minehardt Aug 19 at 14:34

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    $\begingroup$ Is it a practical question for a certain application (e.g. cleaning glassware), or just a search for the best oxidant ( there are plenty exotic compounds and mixtures such as $\ce{ClF3}$ or liquid ozone/oxygen)? $\endgroup$ – andselisk Aug 18 at 14:15
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    $\begingroup$ ...and there is manganese heptoxide. I would recommend staying away from it. $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Aug 18 at 14:23
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In biophysics, when you want to destroy anything organic on a platinum probe(1), you usually use sulfochromic acid (mixture of chromic acid and concentrated sulfuric acid). I do not know anything stronger.

(1) A platinum probe is used just because it can handle being subjected to sulfochromic acid. Most other metals would not.

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There are many, many dozens of substances and mixtures that can readily oxidize organic matter, in some cases explosively. The degree of completeness of the oxidation process is dependent on the specific circumstances, e.g., is the organic matter sucrose or a piece of wood?

That said, a few notable oxidizing substances (or liquid mixtures) are the various sulfuric acid family members (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_oxoacid), chlorosulfuric acid, fluorosulfuric acid, nitrosylsulfuric acid, white fuming nitric acid (WFNA), red fuming nitric acid (RFNA), hydrogen peroxide (30% or higher), $\ce{FOOF}$, $\ce{OF2}$, $\ce{ClF3}$, ‘mixed acid' (WFNA with 10-17% $\ce{H2SO4}$), $\ce{FNO3}$, $\ce{FClO4}$, $\ce{ClF}$, $\ce{BrF5}$, $\ce{F2}$, $\ce{O3}$, $\ce{NO2}$, $\ce{N2O4}$, $\ce{NOF}$, $\ce{F2NNO}$, $\ce{HNF2}$, $\ce{ClF5}$, and far more. And this does not even consider exotica such as alpha particles, plasma etching, ion milling and so on.

Almost all of the substances/solutions listed above are very dangerous and quite a few are either explosive per se or as close to it as makes no difference. Some are way too unstable to exist at room temperature. In some cases, mixtures are possible and have even been made by intrepid people. In other cases, mixtures would be catastrophic.

I highly recommend Dr. John Clark’s book [1] if anyone wants to know more about what happens when extemely powerful oxidizing agents meet various potential rocket fuels. (This is the source of some of the oxidizing agents listed above.) Dr. Clark was a physical chemist with deep insider knowledge of the development of liquid fuel rockets.

[1] J.D. Clark, Ignition! An Informal History of Liquid Rocket Propellants, Rutgers University Press Classics, New Brunswick, NJ, ©1972 & 2017.

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