0
$\begingroup$

In cathode ray tube experiment in order to check the direction of flow of electrons a hole was made in a note and behind it phosphorescent material zinc sulfide it was coated.

Why does zinc sulfide glow when hit by electrons? What causes this glow?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

This is an example of phosphorescence. The Wikipedia page of zinc sulfide and phosphorescence can explain it better than I do, but in short, when zinc sulfide get hit by electrons, electrons transfer some of its energy to zinc sulfide and excites its electron. Zinc sulfide stores the energy for a while, then emit light when the electron goes back to its ground level.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ And it is cheaper than diamond ( that also glows). $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 Aug 2 at 15:24

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.