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How do I determine if a Metal Fluoride is soluble in liquid Gallium and under what conditions the Metal Fluoride will stay in solution in the liquid Gallium?

I am involved in a project that is testing approaches to using CVD to form a graphene layer on liquid Gallium. Fluorine has been used in the process to disassociate methane into carbon and hydrogen and to speed the deposition of carbon. In our project, we are using Acetelyne.

We want to try a different approach of adding a small amount of Fluorine into the liquid gallium itself. With the energies involved it should allow a small amount of F to interact with the process at the surface. I am familiar with all the other aspects but I have never dealt with trying to dope liquid gallium with Fluorine.

My thought was to add a Metal Flouride to liquid Gallium at an appropriate temp/pressure to have it dissolve in the liquid metal. The resulting liquid would be used as a base for deposition at temperatures between 200c to 700c at varying plasma energy levels.

I am considering a few options; SnF2, GaF3, and NaF

Gallium Fluoride would be the best for my application, but the other two are easier to obtain and should still work.

This is going to be < 1 milligram of Metalic Fluoride compound per gram of Gallium and never more than 10 grams of the resulting product at any time.

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  • $\begingroup$ If the person who voted this question down would give me some feedback I would be happy to improve the question. Without that, I have no idea what the issue is. $\endgroup$ – drobertson Jul 20 at 18:33
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    $\begingroup$ Well, you can see some reasons if you hover mouse over downvote button. Also downvoting is made specifically to criticise in a simple and anonymous way. I'm considering downvoting myself as this seems kinda too broad; also what's the context of this experiment? BTW Salts in general aren't particularly soluble in metals (maybe enough for it to be doable though), and fluorides are especially "salty". $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 20 at 20:51
  • $\begingroup$ I am involved in a project that is testing approaches to using CVD to form a graphene layer on liquid Gallium. Fluorine has been used in the process to disassociate methane into carbon and hydrogen and to speed the deposition of carbon. We want to try a different approach of adding a small amount of F into the liquid gallium itself. With the energies involved it should allow a small amount of F to interact with the process at the surface. I am familiar with all the other aspects but I have never dealt with trying to dope liquid gallium with Fluorine. I can add this to the question if it helps. $\endgroup$ – drobertson Jul 20 at 20:59
  • $\begingroup$ @drobertson his post is a cascade of questions subsequent to each other. So I would suggest to probe first if your metal fluorides enter the host material in a quantity easy to trace. My current understanding of your project is that both gallium and the metal fluoride are deposited while the graphene layer builds, i.e. eventually both gallium and metal fluoride are within the deposit. If so, I would give X-ray fluorescence / EDX a try to trace the uptake, especially the havy cations, in these thin films. $\endgroup$ – Buttonwood Jul 21 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ @Buttonwood Thanks for replying. I think you have the idea slightly off. The Gallium/Metal Fluoride mixture is prepped first and placed in a shallow tray that is at a slight electrical charge relative to the plasma. The environment is low vacuum argon. Acetylene is fed in through a chamber where it is ionized and partially disassociated at a slow rate. The outflow of this process is fed over the Gallium/ Metal Fluoride mix. Different pressures, temp, ionization levels and electrical potentials are being tested. The goal is to quantify the Graphene growth on the Gallium Surface. $\endgroup$ – drobertson Jul 21 at 20:17

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