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What effect does an Amine based quaternary ammonium compound have on urea/uric acid? Will an amine based quaternary ammonium product react with uric acid and get rid of the smell?

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  • $\begingroup$ The premise of this question is a little off. Urea and uric acid are both odorless; any smell is due to other compounds. $\endgroup$ – Zhe Jul 9 at 16:49
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Uric acid, according to this site, is odorless:

Uric Acid is a white tasteless odorless crystalline product of protein metabolism, found in the blood and urine, as well as trace amounts found in the various organs of the body. It can build up and form stones or crystals in various disease states.

Urea, according to this site, is also odorless:

Other nitrogen-containing compounds are found in urine. A large number of different compounds can affect the smell of urine, and it can be influenced by diet (as people who’ve experienced the effects of eating asparagus can attest). Whilst the urea in urine is odourless, it can quickly break down into other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as ammonia and trimethylamine. Ammonia has a pungent smell, but a higher odour threshold than trimethylamine, which has a fishy odour – and is in fact the compound responsible for the smell of fish. These compounds are continuously created as urea breaks down, which explains why stale urine smells much worse than fresh urine.

You asked:

Will an amine based quaternary ammonium product react with uric acid and get rid of the smell?

Quaternary ammonium salts, on the other hand, might have a smell of their own. So if I understand your question, the answer is no.

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