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I was thinking of maybe making it bubble into a solution containing something that would react with H2 yielding either a dissolved substance or a precipitate from the reaction.


Maybe a solution with a small amount of H2O2 in it?

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closed as too broad by Mithoron, Jon Custer, Todd Minehardt, Karsten Theis, Mathew Mahindaratne Jun 15 at 22:52

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "neutralise"? In chemistry this usually suggests an acid-base reaction, or decomposition of dangerous/hazardous substances. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Jun 12 at 18:03
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    $\begingroup$ @andselisk It is to avoid the dangerous accumulation of H2 gas (produced as a byproduct of a reaction) into the room where I carry out the reaction. I'd like to avoid explosion/fire hazards. $\endgroup$ – Veritas Jun 12 at 18:10
  • $\begingroup$ If it would react, it could as well react dangerously If you are not going to burn it, you may to mix it with excess of air or nitrogen, keeping hydrogen safely below explosive concentration. $\endgroup$ – Poutnik Jun 12 at 18:21
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    $\begingroup$ H2O2 won't help at all. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 12 at 18:42
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    $\begingroup$ You really need to contact your local ES&H/Safety person and follow their instructions. If you have no such person, stop and do not proceed. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jun 12 at 22:46
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Many nuclear power plants use so-called "passive autocatalytic recombiners" for the catalytic oxidization of hydrogen that could be released into the containment in the event of severe accidents. (Note that the affected units of the Fukushima-Daiichi plant did not have such equipment.) The catalytically active materials, typically platinum and/or palladium, are doted on carriers, preferably designed as catalyst plates orientated vertically to support the flow.

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