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What is the difference between polyethylene and polypropylene in terms of their aspects which are harmful to the environment during manufacture and disposal.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Karl, Mithoron, Jon Custer, Todd Minehardt, airhuff May 17 at 3:25

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Define "better" and "environment", e.g. criteria to compare plastics and where they are going to be used. $\endgroup$ – andselisk May 16 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ Recycled glass containers like soft drink and milk bottles of old. $\endgroup$ – MaxW May 16 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ Obviously the one which is technically better suited for the application, because you need less of it. $\endgroup$ – Karl May 16 at 20:39
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    $\begingroup$ @andselisk I made an edit to the question, then noticed your comment. I didn't mean to circumvent your question. The word "better" can be a "downvote attractor", so I sometimes try to rescue a new user from too many of them. $\endgroup$ – uhoh May 16 at 22:38
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Every material is terrible if not properly collected and processed after use.

Wether you re-use it (like glass bottles), or recycle the material, or burn it to make electricity and district heating, is small potatoes.

What material you use is also not very important, only the actual energy and environmental costs of "bio"materials like paper or cotton are very high. You have to re-use them very often before they make sense!

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