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Is there pure iron in nature, would that be not become Iron Oxide (rust) immediately because of the humidity? How do we produce iron ore/dust on the lab/industry?

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  • $\begingroup$ I suppose it depends on what physical state (phase) you mean. There is probably plenty of molten iron in the interior of the earth. Much of the iron in our lithosphere started and never stopped oxidizing when oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms evolved. To produce unoxidized iron from the oxide you need to reduce it, for instance with carbon, see eg chem.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Inorganic_Chemistry/… $\endgroup$ – Buck Thorn May 15 at 15:29
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    $\begingroup$ Previously I used to think that the knowledge of iron metallurgy is safely stored in the books and Wikipedia. Turns out I was wrong. It is kinda scary to think that it may die with me. Then again, why bother. Apres moi le deluge! $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin May 15 at 16:10
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    $\begingroup$ @IvanNeretin en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telluric_iron ? ;-) $\endgroup$ – Karl May 15 at 19:55
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    $\begingroup$ For @Karl Telluric Iron is either Iron with lots of Carbon, or Iron with Nickel. So I guess Iron really does not exists on its own in Nature. Perhaps only noble metals like Gold or Silver has this property. $\endgroup$ – RonPringadi May 15 at 20:06
  • $\begingroup$ @RonPringadi Nope. Silver and gold are always contaminated with each other, + copper, palladium, etc. ;-) $\endgroup$ – Karl May 15 at 20:11
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Fairly pure iron (or iron/nickel alloys) are found in meteoric iron. Some of these are surprisingly corrosion resistant... close to stainless steels. One well-known example is a dagger from Tutankhamun's tomb. See JSTOR for some more uses of meteoric iron.

As for iron smelting, there is much information on the web, and I suggest you try some research.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it appropriate to describe an alloy as "pure"? $\endgroup$ – William R. Ebenezer May 15 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ @WilliamR.Ebenezer Depends on your own conception of what makes a material pure. $\endgroup$ – Karl May 15 at 19:53
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    $\begingroup$ Based on the comment from @Karl the wikipedia article stated "Type 2 telluric iron also contains around 0.05 to 4% nickel, but typically less than 0.7% carbon" Assuming the rest of 99.25% is Iron, this may be the closest one we have to pure Iron in nature. $\endgroup$ – RonPringadi May 15 at 20:09

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