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When you add CO2 into water, carbonic acid is created. From carbonic acid (H2CO3), HCO3 + H is formed. When CO2, and H2CO3 leave the water, does HCO3 leave as well, often measure as kH, carbonate hardness?

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The chemistry is a bit more complicated than you have described. When $\ce{CO2}$ dissolves in water, most of the carbon species are dissolved $\ce{CO2}$. Carbonic acid, the bicarbonate anion and the carbonate anion are minor carbon species. (See the Wikipedia article - Carbonic Acid.)

You can remove the $\ce{CO2}$ by boiling the water, or by sparging (blowing bubbles of a gas containing no $\ce{CO2}$ in the water). But it is only $\ce{CO2}$ that will leave the solution. The equilibriums with carbonic acid, bicarbonate, and carbonate all shift of course as $\ce{CO2}$ is removed.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. Do you know how the equilibriums with carbonic acid, bicarbonate, and carbonate all shift of course as CO2 is removed? $\endgroup$ – Mistergreen Apr 18 at 14:08
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, see the Wikipedia article on Carbonic acid. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Apr 18 at 14:25

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