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Are LiBr and LiCl ionic or covalent? Are they soluble in water? Some texts say they are partially soluble in water and in organic solvents also. Or can it be believed that they have more of a covalent character than ionic character ?

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  • $\begingroup$ You are asking too many questions. I'm gonna answer about the covalent character in $\ce{LiCl}$ & $\ce{LiBr}$ $\endgroup$ – Fitz Watson Mar 31 '19 at 2:16
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$\ce{LiCl}$ and $\ce{LiBr}$ are ionic compounds with a significant covalent character. This is due to the strong polarising power of $\ce{Li^{+}}$ cation. This polarising power is due to its large charge to mass ratio.

$\ce{Li^{+}}$ pulls the electron cloud of the halogen, hence resulting in a covalent character. The covalent character is more in $\ce{LiBr}$ than $\ce{LiCl}$ as $\ce{Br^-}$ is larger in size, hence valence shell is held comparatively loosely.

enter image description here This is what essentially happens.

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$\ce{LiCl}$ is hygroscopic. If stored in not well tight container, it gradually absorbs water from air up to the point it creates a solution. I suppose $\ce{LiBr}$ can be similar. The ion $\ce{Li+}$ is very small with strong electrostatic field that attracts electron pairs of water to form the coordinate bonds.

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