0
$\begingroup$

CaCO3 (s) = CaO (s) + CO2 (g)

We know that pure solids quantity doesn't affect the position of equilibrium. But the application of pressure in gas does.

If we add CaCO3 in the closed system, the position of equilibrium should change, shouldn't it?

If we add CaCO3 the concentration shouldn't increase but the pressure in closed system should increase. Then it should affect in CO2 because the pressure has been increased.

Then why this is told that that pure solids quantity doesn't affect the position of equilibrium?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ You are saying that CaCO3 is added to a system of unchanged volume or mass/matter (except the given addition)? $\endgroup$ – A.K. Mar 19 at 2:55
  • $\begingroup$ Because we live in a world that is open, and most systems are under constant pressure, not constant volume. $\endgroup$ – Zhe Mar 19 at 3:00
  • $\begingroup$ I am saying about a system of unchanged volume. $\endgroup$ – Md.Luban Mehda Mar 19 at 3:03
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I'm sorry I meant to say unchanged volume and unchanged mass/matter (except the given addition). $\endgroup$ – A.K. Mar 19 at 3:55
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I don't understand the question. You see it all the time. You live in a world that is constant pressure and not constant volume. $\endgroup$ – Zhe Mar 19 at 11:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.