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Popular bleaching brands like Clorox contain liquid sodium hypochlorite in small concentrations, ranging from 5-12.5% (is this a mass/volume, mass/mass, or volume/volume concentrate?).

Is it possible to achieve a 100% concentrate in liquid form (pure NAClO)? Experimentally, I've found it's boiling point to be around 35°C, but I would assume that its melting point is fairly high in comparison.

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Wikipedia disagrees with your figures. They give a melting point only for the pentahydrate (18°C, at which point this forms not pure sodium hypochlirite but a solution of one mole sodium hypochlirite to five moles water). The only reported phase transition for the neat compound is a "boiling point" of 101°C which is actually a decomposition point.

So I would not bet on getting pure liquid sodium hypochlorite, although as mentioned above the pentahydrate can be converted to a fairly concentrated solution.

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  • $\begingroup$ So if that (not having anything aside from a pentahydrate to be a 17% concentrate solution max) were to be the case; what would happen if I took a pure tablet of sodium hypochlorite and heated it to 20°C? $\endgroup$ – Inferfire Mar 4 at 3:16
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    $\begingroup$ "what would happen if I took a pure tablet of sodium hypochlorite and heated it to 20°C?" Nothing worth noting. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Mar 4 at 10:08

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