0
$\begingroup$

Do pure and dry hydrogen are the same? What does dry hydrogen actually means. And what does pure hydrogen means.

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by andselisk, Mithoron, Tyberius, Todd Minehardt, Nuclear Chemist Feb 23 at 20:35

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ This is not really about chemistry, rather meaning of the words: dry vs. pure. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Feb 22 at 3:37
  • $\begingroup$ dry means without water, pure means only the relevant species are present. $\endgroup$ – Buck Thorn Feb 22 at 14:09
0
$\begingroup$

It depends what you (or your field) is considering what an impurity is for a given substance. For example, if you want really pure methane, ethane will became an impurity. However, if you want gaseous alkane(s), there is no real difference between methane and ethane, so ethane is no longer an impurity.

On the other side, moisture can be your enemy, so pure methane (without ethane) can be considered bad if it contains 3% water whereas a mixture of methane and ethane (50/50) could be considered better because it contains only 0.1% water.

In your case, "pure hydrogen" would mean that "it is composed almost entirely of hydrogen gas" (but it can contain water) whereas "dry hydrogen" would rather mean that the gas does not contain water (but it can contain other molecules as well, but not too much)

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Well, I wouldn't consider a wet gas pure unless water is not considered an impurity.... $\endgroup$ – Buck Thorn Feb 23 at 8:56

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.