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Can I get brief explanation of the reactions that occur under Glycolysis? What do the curved lines represent?

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Glycolysis is a process of which converts Glucose(Described as C$_{6}$ in your diagram), to two Pyruvate (2C$_{3}$). Then in downstream of glycolysis, Pyruvates are then converted to AcetylCoA to be used for many things in body. Glycolysis is part of a metabolic pathway, and in total it uses 1 Glucose, 2 ATP, 2 NAD+ to produce 2 Pyruvate, 4 ATP and 2 NADH. So those curve lines represents the Total input and output of energy. Each step is facilitated by different enzymes, so you could search for enzymes in each step for more information about each reaction. Wikipedia has table of each reactions.

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What do the curved lines represent?

This is a schematic diagram of glycolysis where the metabolites are shown on the left side and the cofactors on the right. Intead of writing a reaction $\ce{A + B -> C + D}$, you can write it as $\ce{A -> D}$ with a curved arrow indicating that B is also a reactant and C is also a product.

In the case of formation of ATP, there are two reactions that are coupled. In the case of formation of NADH, there is a single redox reaction with two half reactions, a reduction half reaction yielding NADH, and an oxidation half reaction oxidizing the intermediate in glycolysis.

Can I get brief explanation of the reactions that occur under Glycolysis?

There is not enough information in the diagram to discuss the reactions that occur. What you do see is that glucose is broken down into two smaller molecules, and that this goes along with the production of two molecules of ATP (from ADP) and two molecules of NADH (from NAD+). This describes the net reaction, skipping many of the details (such that two molecules of ATP are hydrolized in early steps, and four molecules of ATP are formed in later steps).

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